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  1. Previous classification schemes

    Before the introduction of the Water Framework Directive, SEPA had a number of classification schemes which we used to report the status of Scotland's water environment.
    Before the introduction of the Water Framework Directive, SEPA had a number of classification schemes which we used to report the status of Scotland's water environment. Classification schemes Coastal water quality Estuarine water quality Loch water quality River water quality Water quality classification results 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 1996 - 2000 classifications Riv ...

  2. Forecasting flooding

    SEPA works with the Met Office to forecast flooding in Scotland, providing accurate and timely information to help emergency responders, local authorities, the public and other organisations prepare for flooding.
    Scottish Flood Forecasting Service This strategic partnership between the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) and the Met Office combines hydrological and meteorological information for the first time, so that both organisations can share their expertise to improve the accuracy of flood forecasts for the whole of Scotland. We collect data from our network of over 250 rainfall, river an ...

  3. Special Sites

    A special site is contaminated land which meets one of the descriptions in the regulations: for example, land on which a process subject to Integrated Pollution Control is, or has been, operated. Special sites do not necessarily represent the most heavily contaminated land: special site designation is the responsibility of local authorities, who are required to seek advice from us.
    As part of the requirements of Part IIA, we are obliged to maintain a public register containing details of special sites. Public registers of land identified as statutorily contaminated are maintained by local authorities, who should be contacted for information on contaminated land other than special sites. A special site is contaminated land which meets one of the descriptions in the regulatio ...

  4. Groundwater

    Groundwater, how it is regulated and the guidanceand legislation that is used to protect it.
    Groundwater resources are essential to many individuals, companies and communities to supply water for drinking, agriculture and industry. Groundwater also maintains wetlands and river flow during dry spells and is vital to the maintenance of their rich ecology and biodiversity. We aim to provide a sustainable future for Scotland's groundwater resources by protecting  the water environment and ot ...

  5. Access to Information

    We are also required to produce and maintain a publication scheme, making as much information available as possible.  Making a request for information Making a request for personal data SEPA's Disclosure Log Reviews and appeals Making a request for SEPA’s information We have adopted the Model Publication Scheme, produced by the Scottish Information Commissioner. You can view the model s ...

  6. Biodiversity

    Biodiversity sustains the natural systems that provide vital goods and services to society, supporting tourism, farming, forestry, aquaculture and fishing industries. It adds variety to our urban green spaces and contributes to improving the health and wellbeing of the people of Scotland. For all of these reasons, biodiversity is important to SEPA. SEPA is a key partner in the delivery of the Scot ...

  7. Class 3: How we take decisions

    Here you will Information about the decisions we take, how we make decisions and how we involve others. The information we publish under this class Information published Description How to access it Decision making     Decisions taken by SEPA: agendas, reports and papers provided for consideration and minutes of Board (or equivalent) meetings. Legally, the Agency Board ...

  8. European pollutant release and transfer register (E-PRTR)

    European pollutant release and transfer register (E-PRTR) The European Regulation on Pollutant Release and Transfer Register entered into force on the 24 February 2006 (E-PRTR Regulation). The 2007 data was the first year of data. The Regulation requires operators of industries regulated by SEPA and falling under the activities listed in Annex I of the Regulation to report their releases and tran ...

  9. Energy

    Energy, both renewable and non-renewable, is one of Scotland’s largest and most important resources. However, while energy is fundamental to the economy, its production, transmission and use can have significant environmental impacts. SEPA’s role across the energy arena is to advise, influence, regulate and monitor the effects of electricity, heat and fuel generation, transmission and consumption ...

  10. Flytipping

    Flytipping can be hazardous to health, causes environmental damage, looks unsightly and costs considerable sums of taxpayers’ money to clean up. Flytipping, or the illegal disposal of waste, is a major problem in certain areas. It occurs in both urban and rural areas and clearing it up costs Scottish local authorities more than £2.5 million each year. It also undermines legitimate waste business ...